This picture says:

GOD SEES THE TRUTH BUT WAITS.
GOD WAITS ON US TO OPEN OUR EYES AND EARS
TO JUSTICE AND CHARITY.
LET US BE PART OF GOD'S JUSTICE 
WHOSE PROPERTY IT IS ALWAYS TO HAVE MERCY
AND TO SPARE.

-Dorothy Day
 

VOICES FOR PEACE
Mar 8, 1999

VFP reprints the following abridged articles today:

No End In Sight to US Campaign Over Iraq Military;
Attacks in ‘no-fly’ zones continue in low-key fashion so as not to stir criticism
-Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times, Mar 3 1999

The near-daily assaults by US warplanes in Iraq are rapidly escalating into a war of attrition that could go on as long as the Arab world and the American public continue to give their silent assent.

The campaign that began Dec. 28 already has become the longest sustained US air operation since the Vietnam War.

“We’re using more bombs, striking more targets.  You can see we’re serious,” one military official said.

The surprising lack of public reaction to the recurring strikes “has won the [US] government some time,” said Zalmay Khalilzad, a Rand Corp. analyst who was a top Pentagon offical during the 1991 Persian Gulf War.

For this reason, Pentagon officials have provided skimpier details of the strikes than during the four-day bombardment of Iraq in mid-December.  They have disclosed the targets and ordnance involved but have shied away from divulging details of the damage inflicted – and have said nothing about casualties.  They haven’t released ‘gun camera’ video footage of US planes striking Iraqi defenses, as they did during the Dec. 16-19 air campaign called Operation Desert Fox.

US officials speak of “enforcement actions” when referring to the attacks.  They never call the strikes a “campaign,” much less a “war.”

“This is self-defense,” Pentagon spokesmen Keeneth Bacon said Tuesday.


Embargo makes deathbeds of hospital beds for Iraqi children
by Charlie Reese, in the Orlando Sentinel, Mar 2 1999

Johanna Berrigan, a Catholic Worker lay person out of Philadelphia, is used to working with poor
people, but she wasn’t prepared for a ‘death row of infants’ that she found in Baghdad hospitals.

The hospitals, devoid of almost everything they need, and staffed by doctors exhausted and grieving, are just a place to die for the thousands of Iraqi children suffering from diseases and infections brought on by the malnutrition and contaminated water.

Our government is reponsible for that.  The embargo on Iraq, which even denies the Iraqis chlorine to use for purifying their water supply, has become a weapon of mass destruction.  Half a million dead children – and that’s a United Nations number – is mass destruction, I would say.

Berrigan said in 1989 about 92 per cent of the Iraqis had access to health care and that education was free through the university level.  In that year, there was not a single case of cholera in the country.  Today, there are thousands of cases – a direct result of contaminated water.  There has been a fourfold increase in childhood leukemia, possibly linked to the depleted uranium the United States used in its shells.

… Gen. Norman Schwartzkopf said [of the 1991 Gulf War], “We have bombed Iraq back into the pre-industrial age.”  That was a great feat for a superpower, taking on a Third World country with only 100 or so out-of-date airplanes.  But he was admitting what is now evident:  We bombed a heck of a lot more than just military targets.

… We are showing the world a cruel and ugly face, and sooner or later there will be payback.  And, by the way, don’t call yourself a Christian if you turn your back on these dying children.